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Beethoven Eroicahaus

Where a large part of Beethoven’s 3rd symphony, the “Eroica” was brought to life

Like many wealthy Viennese people, Ludwig von Beethoven once spent time at a summer retreat just outside the city. In 1803, this was in Oberdöbling im Biederhof, and is today called the Eriocahaus after the work that Beethoven composed there. Back then, it was surrounded by gardens, fields, and vineyards. It was here that the composer worked on his 3rd symphony, the “Erioca”, from May to November. Its audacity, imagination, and even the length paved the way for this work to outclass all those that Beethoven had created previously. Perhaps this was also due to the Eriocahaus.

Außenansicht des Beethoven Gebäudes
Eroicahaus – Foto: Hertha Hurnaus © Wien Museum

Exhibition rooms in Eroicahaus

Beethoven actually initially dedicated this symphony to Napoleon, but changed this after he learned of his imperial coronation. Beethoven thanked high nobility, who often supported him financially, by dedicating his works to his patrons. This was also the case with the “Waldstein Sonata” and the “Triple Concerto op. 56” for the Royal House of Lobkowitz, while were also written in the Eriocahaus at this time. Moreover, the house still looked different then. It was not until the middle of the 19th century that the building looked as it does today. Tip: Entry to the Eroicahaus is free of charge on the first Sunday of every month.

Innenansicht der Ausstellungsräume
Eroicahaus – Foto: Hertha Hurnaus © Wien Museum

Note: If you want to visit the Eroicahaus, you have to register in advance (at least 2 weeks before your desired date) at tel. +43 1 505 8747-85180 or service@wienmuseum.at.

How to reach the Eroicahaus

Address: Döblinger Hauptstraße 92, 1190 Wien
Public transport: Tram line 37, stop: Pokornygasse
Map:

Further information on the Eroicahaus opening hours.